Facts for Features: Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month – U.S. Census Bureau

Facts for Features: Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month: May 2013 - Facts for Features & Special Editions - Newsroom - U.S. Census Bureau

Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month: May 2013

In 1978, a joint congressional resolution established Asian/Pacific American Heritage Week. The first 10 days of May were chosen to coincide with two important milestones in Asian/Pacific American history: the arrival in the United States of the first Japanese immigrants (May 7, 1843) and contributions of Chinese workers to the building of the transcontinental railroad, completed May 10, 1869. In 1992, Congress expanded the observance to a monthlong celebration. Per a 1997 Office of Management and Budget directive, the Asian or Pacific Islander racial category was separated into two categories: one being Asian and the other Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander. Thus, this Facts for Features contains a section for each.

Asians

18.2 million

The estimated number of U.S. residents in 2011 who were Asian, either alone or in combination with one or more additional races.
Source: 2011 Population Estimates Table 3 <www.census.gov/popest/data/index.html>. For additional information, see <www.census.gov/popest/data/national/asrh/2011/index.html>.

5.8 million

The Asian alone or in combination population in California in 2011. The state had the largest Asian population, followed by New York (1.7 million). The Asian alone-or-in-combination population represented 57 percent of the total population in Hawaii.
Source: 2011 Population Estimates Table 5 <www.census.gov/popest/data/index.html>. For additional information, see <www.census.gov/popest/data/state/asrh/2011/index.html>.

46%

Percentage growth of the Asian alone or in combination population between the 2000 and 2010 censuses, which was more than any other major race group.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File, Custom Table 3, <www.census.gov/2010census/news/xls/cb11cn123_us_2010redistr.xls>. For additional details, see Hoeffel, E., S. Rastogi, M. Kim, and H. Shahid. 2011. The Asian Population: 2010, U.S. Census Bureau, 2010 Census Briefs, C2010BR-11, available at<www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-11.pdf>.

4 million

Number of Asians of Chinese, except Taiwanese, descent in the U.S. in 2011. The Chinese (except Taiwanese) population was the largest Asian group, followed by Filipinos (3.4 million), Asian Indians (3.2 million), Vietnamese (1.9 million), Koreans (1.7 million) and Japanese (1.3 million). These estimates represent the number of people who reported a specific detailed Asian group alone, as well as people who reported that detailed Asian group in combination with one or more other detailed Asian groups or another race(s).
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2011 American Community Survey, Table B02018 <http://factfinder2.census.gov/bkmk/table/1.0/en/ACS/11_1YR/B02018>

Read more… Facts for Features: Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month: May 2013 – Facts for Features & Special Editions – Newsroom – U.S. Census Bureau.

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