Archive | November 2013

9 Things About Asian American Christianity | The Exchange | A Blog by Ed Stetzer

Quick post for the morning.   My awesome friend and co-laborer in the ministry shares some interesting facts for Asian Americans.

DJ Chuang has spent most of his life being the voice and connector for diversity and multi-ethnic ministries.  He’s usually the first to report facts about AA trends.  Here’s an excerpt from the article in Ed Stetzer’s blog:

4. Asian Americans are more educated and have higher median family income than any other racial groups; but that’s not the whole picture. On the one hand, Asian Americans have a lot of latent capacity to be developed for greater and wider impact, but on the other hand, statistics about Asian Americans has often been misused by overgeneralizing and perpetuating the “model minority” myth. The reality is that there many who have achieved much educationally and financially, but there are also significant numbers of Asian Americans are disadvantaged and struggling, especially among Southeast Asians and smaller Asian groups.

5. 64% of Asian Americans speak English very well. Language fluency is a good indicator of cultural fluency, but it’s not necessarily determinant of how someone will respond to spiritual things. I’ve heard that a good missionary practice is to present spiritual truths in the heart language of a person, but in the American context, English can be very effective in presenting the Gospel, if done in a contextualized manner and not merely a generic “color-blind” manner. Briefly speaking, contextualizing means recognizing the diversity in people’s backgrounds and socializing; that is to say, “all-American” sports analogies will not connect with all Americans.

6. 42% of Asian Americans self-identify as Christian, that is, 22% Protestant and 19% Catholic. Note that these survey results also indicate that 75% of the U.S. general public self-identify as Christians. Take a closer look at the numbers across ethnic lines, and you’ll notice something very different for each ethnic group. As the chart illustrates, the most churched are Filipino Americans and Korean Americans, with a majority of Filipino being Catholic and Korean being Protestant.

Read the whole article here: 9 Things About Asian American Christianity | The Exchange | A Blog by Ed Stetzer.

Responding to the Horror of a Broken World?

lax-map-shooting-1

Map of LAX shooting

On Friday, November 1 – a tragic act of insanity brought the third busiest airport to their knees in terror.  It just so happened to be my home airport where I have traveled countless times.  A friend of mine was traveling out of town that day as well.  I had just dropped him and his wife off in the morning to pick up their car. THEN, I heard the news.  With social media in today’s world, news travels faster than the speed of light at times.

Yes, our initial reaction is to skim through the news and web for the answer to the question, “WHY?”

I came across Stetzer’s blog last year around this time.  He was writing to our response to the shooting at the Connecticut school shootout…. Here’s some wonderful talking points as you bring more light and clarity to a broken world.  First, PRAY for hurting families and churches to rally around with compassion.  Second, don’t be afraid to say the world is horribly broken.  Third, DO something about it.

…don’t just watch the television news. Do something to change the broken world– show and share the love of Jesus. Again. More.  The hurting world needs God’s people living as those who care, because we do care. We can’t fix everything, but we can do something.  Let’s grieve with and pray for the hurting. Let’s call the world what it is– broken. Then, let’s recommit ourselves to living for Jesus and others in a broken world.  Hold your kids, cling to Jesus, and cry out, ‘Your Kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.’ Maranatha.

Read more here …. Three Ways Christians Should Respond to the Horror of a Broken World | The Exchange | A Blog by Ed Stetzer.

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